Introducing Michael Vidana

Michael Vidana
Michael Vidana is a second year master's student in the Counseling Psychology program at the University of Southern Mississippi. He is originally from Minnesota and received his Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of Wisconsin - River Falls in 2014.

As an undergraduate, Michael worked on an independent research project focusing on the behavioral effects of a college smoking ban. His curiosity in research and counseling continued to evolve by studying abroad, ultimately guiding him to apply to the master's program at Southern Miss.

Michael aims to become a licensed professional counselor upon graduation and is interested in a career in community mental health. As such, he hopes to take advantage of the opportunities offered by the Community Counseling and Assessment Clinic, our program's in-house training clinic where both master's and doctoral students obtain much of their practicum experience under the supervision of program faculty. This experience, along with his coursework in the master's program, will prepare Michael to pursue licensure.

In addition to completing a literature review on alcohol-related aggression, one of the ways Michael has been assisting the Anger and Traffic Psychology Lab is working with his peers to write biographical statements (just like this one) for our website. This is something we have been talking about doing for some time because we think it is helpful information for potential applicants to have. With Michael taking the lead on it, we are finally doing it!

When asked for advice concerning potential future applicants to our program, Michael voiced the importance of taking the time to create a well-crafted personal statement that best represents what an applicant has to offer to the program and makes a case for why the applicant is a good fit with the program.
Comments

Paper on Relational Aggression in College Students Soon to be Published

A paper authored by Eric R. Dahlen, Katherine A. Czar, Emily Prather, and Christy Dyess will soon be published in the Journal of College Student Development. The paper, "Relational aggression and victimization in college students," has been in press for some time, and it will be nice to see it appear in print.

The brief abstract for the paper is below:
For this study we explored relational aggression and victimization in a college sample (N = 307), examining potential gender and race differences, correlates, and the link between relational aggression and common emotional and behavioral problems, independent of relational victimization. Gender and race differences were observed on relational aggression and victimization. Relational aggression in peer and intimate relationships was positively correlated with depression, anxiety, stress, anger, and alcohol problems. Independent of gender, race, and relational victimization, peer relational aggression was predicted by anxiety, trait anger, and personal problems related to alcohol use.
Comments